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Looking after your feet

By Latest News

During lockdown many routine appointments, many standard screening appointments are being cancelled. This includes routine podiatry appointments to check the health of your feet, therefore it is more important than ever that you regularly check your feet for any changes.

Foot problems are one of the common complications of diabetes and are caused by nerve damage (neuropathy) or damage to blood vessels in the feet and legs.

Our booklet ‘Looking After Your Feet’ tells you what to look for and is available online by clicking on:
https://www.iddt.org/publications/looking-after-your-feet

If you are concerned about the development of any changes to your feet or lower limbs, you should contact your GP or your usual podiatrist as help is available to prevent the development of serious complications.

 

Eye strain from long periods on a screen

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One way or another, many of us are using various devices and screens for many hours of the day through working from home or in our leisure time. Spending long periods looking at computer, phone, or tablet screens can strain the eyes. Using the 20-20-20 rule can help to prevent this problem.

The rule says that for every 20 minutes spent looking at a screen, a person should look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Read more:
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321536

 

Dream Trust – Dr Pendsey issues advice to parents of children with Type 1 diabetes

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Dream TrustSome of our members sponsor children and young people at the Dream Trust in Nagpur, India and they will be concerned about the health and wellbeing of these vulnerable young people as a result of the lockdown in India.

This article emphasises his advice that they should not lower their insulin doses because of fears of lack of availability of insulin. This link provides you with te English translation of Dr Pendsey’s newspaper article offering advice to families.

Everyday Meals

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Our booklet, ‘Diabetes – Everyday Eating’ provides menus for breakfast, lunch and evening meal for 28 days. The menus are for everyday eating, so ideal for this difficult time when sometimes we can only buy essential items.

As we have lots of time on our hands at the moment, now might be the time to try something different to eat! You can access this booklet on our website at: https://www.iddt.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/A4_Health_Nutrition_Booklet.pdf

 

After Brexit

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Brexit and insulin supplies

As most people are aware, all human and analogue insulins are made outside the UK and only pork insulin is made in the UK. It is understandable that people have concerns about insulin supplies as a result the UK leaving the European Union (Brexit). The insulin manufacturers have stated that they already have stockpiles in the UK and this is more than the normal 6 weeks’ supply recommended by the Government. They have also set up alternative delivery routes into the UK.

 

They are urging people not to stockpile insulin or any other diabetes medication, themselves because this disrupts supplies for everyone and could put some people at risk of not being able to get their insulin. However, it is recommended that people reorder their insulin and other medicine supplies early in case there are local delays.

 

Reassurances from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society have issued a statement to confirm thatprotecting patient care, supporting the pharmacy workforce, and ensuring the continuity of medicines supply will continue to be high priorities for 2021…”Having sought and received assurances from the UK Government, devolved governments, the pharmaceutical industry and others on plans to sustain the supply of medicines following the Brexit transition period while we will continue to monitor the situation in the short-term, the organisation’s focus for 2021 will be on the medium to long-term plans for pharmaceutical care.”

 

Post Brexit changes

Perhaps it is difficult to see at the present time, but there will come a time when we can safely travel abroad again. We are all aware that the UK has left the EU but because of the pandemic, perhaps we are not as aware of the changes as we would otherwise have been…

 

The changes affect us all, but some are particularly important for people with long-term health conditions, such as diabetes, so below is a brief outline of the key changes.

 

Health insurance

EHIC and GHIC – for travel within most European countries we have previously had a free European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). This remains valid until it runs out and then you have to apply for a free Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC). Just like an EHIC, it is possible to apply for this new card on behalf of yourself, but also your spouse/ partner, your children (under 16) and other family members. However, you and each person on the application must meet the nationality and residency conditions which basically are focused on making sure that you and they are UK citizens.

You get a GHIC card by applying on the NHS website: https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/healthcare-abroad/apply-for-a-free-ehic-european-health-insurance-card/ Be aware that there are some websites that try to ‘sell’ these cards, so do not fall for this, the official cards are free.

A still valid EHIC or the new GHIC enables you to benefit from prompt, largely free health services in the 27 countries which are part of the European Union but from 1st January 2021, neither a GHIC nor most EHICs will cover you in Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland. When visiting these countries, you must make sure your travel insurance covers you for healthcare cover.

NOT a replacement for travel insurance – it is important to remember that the GHIC (or valid EHIC) is NOT an alternative to travel insurance. It helps you to access types of healthcare quickly and usually free at the point of delivery but not all countries offer the same free services that you would receive on the NHS so you could have to pay for some services. In addition, travel insurance is still needed for many reasons including getting you home following an injury, illness or specialist treatment for existing health conditions, such as diabetes.

Just a reminder too, that you need to check that any travel insurance you take out, does cover your pre-existing health conditions and this is not always the case with insurance offered by travel agents.

Passports

  • You need at least 6 months on your passport to travel.
  • Your passport must be no older that10 years, even if it has 6 months or more left on it.
  • You can apply online for a new passport at: https://www.gov.uk/apply-renew-passport and the cost is £75.50.
  • A paper application form can be obtained from a Post Office and the cost for this is £85.00.

 

Leading experts slam current diabetes care in UK care homes – a Call to Action needed

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Professor Alan Sinclair slam current diabetes care in UK care homes

Diabetes care in nursing homes still remains “fragmented” and urgent steps need to be taken to restore the “health and dignity” of older people, leading experts have said.

A review of multiple studies carried out across 25 years involving residents with diabetes has slammed care home provision saying that care homes “often do not meet national standards” of diabetes care and staff training is “patchy”. 

Lead author Professor Alan Sinclair, from the Foundation for Diabetes Research in Older People and University of Aston, said: “Our findings show the level of diabetes care remains fragmented which is quite worrying because figures suggest over a quarter of care home residents are believed to have the condition. Without proper management, it can lead to frailty, dependency, disability and reduced life expectancy.

Click here to read more

 

Talking meter removed

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Talking meter removed

Meter for the visually impaired removed from the market
The SuperCheck2 blood glucose meter for visually impaired people has been withdrawn from the market by the manufacturer, Apollo Medical Technologies Ltd. This meter provided blood glucose readings through a voice system.

There is another glucose meter on the market to help visually impaired people with diabetes, the GlucoRx Nexus Voice Meter. This meter uses GlucoRx Nexus test strips and GlucoRx Nexus Lancets.

Animal insulins continue to be available – statement from Wockhardt UK, 30.11.18

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From December 2018, people in the US will not be able to import pork insulin from Wockhardt UK.

This is due to stringent Regulatory Controls, leaving Wockhardt UK with no choice but to discontinue the supply of Hypurin Porcine & Bovine insulin which is directly supplied to the patients in the USA on a “Name Patient basis”.

On November 30th 2018, Wockhardt issued the following statement which offers reassurance to people in the UK who use Hypurin® porcine insulin…

Click here to read more.

neuropad®

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neuropad

neuropad® is a patented 10-minute screening test for the early detection of diabetic foot syndrome; a condition which can lead to serious complications such as foot ulceration and even amputation.  The test is completely painless. Think of the test as an early warning system for your feet.

List of published clinical studies: http://www.neuropad.co.uk/case-studies/
The price of the test comprising of two test pads is £14.99, no VAT payable and can be purchased from our website shop, or by phoning IDDT on 01604 622837.

 

Diabetes-friendly socks

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Diabetes-friendly socks

IDDT now sell diabetes-friendly socks in our online shop. Our Comfort Socks have been developed for use by people with diabetes, vascular disorders and other circulatory problems. Our Fuller Fitting Longer Sock is for people who find it difficult to wear ordinary socks. These are made with a large circumference top and are suitable for people who may be suffering from oedema (swollen legs), for example.

The Comfort Socks retail at £8 and the Fuller Fitting at £12 per pair including p&p. To order your socks, please visit our online shop, or phone IDDT on 01604 622837.

 

Solesee

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soleseeIt is essential that people with diabetes look after their feet properly to avoid ulcers as these can lead to amputations. Prevention of foot problems is very important, therefore your feet should be inspected every day, in addition to daily washing and moisturising. It is not always easy to inspect the soles of your feet but nevertheless, it is important especially for people who have neuropathy with loss of sensation, so they don’t feel pain if an injury occurs.

This mirror, called Solesee, is ideal to enable you to see the soles of your feet and it can be purchased from the IDDT Shop.

InDependent Diabetes Trust
IDDT